Uncategorized | 1800-1859 | Massacres | Pakistan

Massacre at Multan as redcoats shoot the elderly and rape the women

THE SACKING OF MULTAN – 2 JANUARY 1849 On 2 January 1849, British redcoats, under the command of Brigadier-General the Honourable Henry Dundas, raped, pillaged and murdered hundreds of civilians, after fighting their way into the city of Multan, located in what is today the province of Punjab in Pakistan. Historian Saul David comments that…

1900-1919 | Bombing villages | Collective punishments | Livestock targeted | Pakistan | Punitive operations

Three Waziri villages destroyed – 5600 cattle seized

[ 29 November 1902 ] On 29 November 1902, a Reuters correspondent at Peshawar on India’s North West Frontier reported on ‘a punitive expedition’ against the Kabul Khels, a Waziri ethnic group, for previous raids into British held territory. He boasted that as a result of a four pronged invasion of the area by four columns of…

1920-1939 | Civilians slaughtered | Massacres | Pakistan | Uncategorized

Machine guns turned on unarmed Peshawar crowd killing up to 400

[ 23 April 1930 ] On 23 April 1930, British and Gurkha troops opened fire on an unarmed crowd in Peshawar killing at least 20, according to the official estimate, and as many as 400, according to Indian sources.1 A large crowd had gathered at the Qissa Khwani Bazaar to protest the arrest that morning of…

1900-1919 | Bombing villages | Pakistan | RAF crimes

The RAF drops incendiary bombs on North West Frontier villages

9 October 1919 On 9 October 1919, sixteen RAF aircraft dropped incendiary bombs on several villages near Wana in Waziristan on India’s North West Frontier. The intent was to punish the entire population, as it was suspected that some of them had participated in armed resistance against British incursions into their territory. An unforgivable crime. …

1980-1989 | Backing dictatorships | Pakistan

Margaret Thatcher toasts Pakistan’s dictator Zia

8 October 1981 On 8 October 1981 British prime minister Margaret Thatcher attended a banquet hosted by Pakistan’s military dictator, General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq.  In an after dinner speech, she urged other governments to join her’s in supporting the regime, which Britain was already supplying with a large amount of weaponry.  She finished by proposing a…

1920-1939 | Bombing villages | Collective punishments | Pakistan | Punitive operations | RAF crimes

Biggles author on bombing North West Frontier villages for non-payment of fines

30 August 1930 On 30 August 1930, W.E. Johns, an R.A.F. captain and author of the Biggles adventure series,  published an article for the weekly illustrated newspaper The Graphic, under the headline ‘Bombing the Afridis.’ He recounted how entire tribal areas on India’s North West Frontier would be bombed intensively as a collective punishment for failing to pay a…

1920-1939 | Bombing villages | Media propaganda | Pakistan | RAF crimes

RAF starts nine day bombing campaign against Afridi villages

4 August 1930 On 4 August 1930, the R.A.F. commenced a nine day bombing campaign, deploying over 70 aircraft on 1,835 hours of sorties against Afridi villages, deemed to be unfriendly. Most of the settlements were located in the Bara Valley in the remote North West Frontier region of British India, although the surrounding valleys…

1900-1919 | Burning crops | Burning villages | Collective punishments | Pakistan | Punitive operations

Valley of villages and crops burned in Waziristan

24 June 1917 On 24 June 1917, a punitive  military expedition began burning the villages and crops of the Mahsud people in the Khaisara Valley on the North West Frontier. The British Army considered it a necessary collective punishment to deter raids into British held territory in India, explaining that it was ‘an act of…

1800-1859 | Executions | Pakistan

Indian mutineers blown apart, wounding civilian spectators

17 June 1857 Today in 1857, British troops, having disarmed Indian mutineers at Lahore the previous month, executed twelve of them. Two by hanging, one of whom ‘lingered out for a considerable time, as the knot slipped under his chin,’ and a further ten by lashing them to the cannons and then loading blank cartridges…

1920-1939 | Burning villages | Pakistan | Punitive operations

Waziristan villages ‘utterly destroyed’ – villagers left to freeze

7 February 1920 On 7 February 1920, a Reuters report, from the North West Frontier, described how British military operations in Waziristan ‘have now assumed a more punitive character, whole villages being utterly destroyed.’ It added that ‘the majority of the tribesmen are moving their families and portable property hurriedly into the valleys remote from our line…