1860-1899 | Massacres | Prisoners murdered | South Africa | Wounded killed

Battle of Kambula – ‘terrible execution’ as ‘no quarter was shown.’

29 March 1879 On 29 March 1879, British cavalry and troops massacred hundreds of fleeing and wounded Zulu warriors after the Battle of Kambula. The Zulus had been fighting to defend their homeland from a British invasion and despite facing an enemy who was far better equipped, they launched a desperate frontal assault up a…

1860-1899 | Massacres | Media propaganda | South Africa | Wounded killed

After the Battle of Rorke’s Drift – the mass butchery of the wounded

On 23 January 1879 hundreds of Zulu warriors, injured during the battle at Rorke’s Drift the previous day,  were murdered by victorious Redcoats. RORKE’S DRIFT – THE BATTLE Almost everyone knows of the heroic defence of the missionary outpost the previous day, made famous by the 1964 film Zulu starring Michael Caine which remains a television favourite. …

1900-1919 | Famine | Racism | South Africa

Africans starved to save the white garrison of Mafeking

[ 17 May 1900 ] On 17 May 1900, a British army relieved the besieged city of Mafeking during the Second Boer War. It led to street celebrations across Britain and the commander of the besieged garrison, Colonel Robert Baden-Powell, became a national hero.  B-P had ruthlessly maintained food stocks for British troops and European…

1860-1899 | Battlefield butchery | Burning towns and cities | Massacres | Media propaganda | South Africa | Wounded killed

British slaughter Zulu wounded and burn down the city of Ulundi

4 July 1879 On 4 July 1879, British infantry used their overwhelming fire power to decisively defeat the Zulu nation at the battle of Ulundi. The battle itself, in which fifty Zulus were killed for every Redcoat, is occasionally recalled, but the even less glorious aftermath, in which the victorious troops immediately set about slaughtering…

1800-1859 | Burning crops | Burning villages | Livestock targeted | Media propaganda | South Africa | Starvation campaigns

Starvation used as a weapon of war against the Xhosa

26 January 1852 On 26 January 1852, seven columns of British colonial troops were advancing into the Amatola mountains on the eastern fringes of Cape Colony in what is today South Africa, systematically burning all the crops and settlements belonging to the Xhosa people, and seizing their goats, cattle and horses.  Colonial newspapers covered the…

1900-1919 | 1990-1999 | Arms exports | Concentration camps | Saudi Arabia | South Africa

4 DECEMBER

LORD MILNER ON HIGH DEATH RATE IN BRITISH CONCENTRATION CAMPS [ 4 December 1901 ] Lord Milner, Britain’s High Commissioner for Southern Africa, was charged with sorting out the concentration camps for civilian detainees during the Second South African Boer War, after the scandal of their inhumane conditions had been exposed in the press. In…