1950-1959 | Collective punishments | Kenya

Archbishop of York backs collective punishment against Kenyan villages

26 November 1952 On 26 November 1952, Dr. Cyril Garbett, the Archbishop of York, speaking in the House of Lords, backed the British government’s use of collective punishment against villages and often entire districts deemed to be ‘uncooperative’ with Britain’s counter-insurgency campaign to crush the anti-colonial Mau Mau rebellion. During the next four years the…

1950-1959 | Collective punishments | Kenya

Wider powers of collective punishment authorized in Kenya

25 November 1952 Today in 1952, Sir Evelyn Baring, the governor of Kenya, issued new emergency measures designed to widen the conditions for the imposition of collective punishment in areas considered sympathetic to the anti-British Mau Mau insurgency. The pro-Empire Daily Express reported the same day that ‘Africans in the Thomson’s Falls District, where Commander Jock Meiklejohn…

1950-1959 | Collective punishments | Concentration camps | Detention without trial | Kenya | Martial law

British governor of Kenya declares a state of emergency

20 October 1952 Today in 1952, Kenya’s governor, Evelyn Baring, signed a state of emergency.  In the early hours of the following morning, in an operation code-named Jock Scott, 106 Kenyan civil rights leaders and individuals suspected of being overly sympathetic to an anti-British rebellion, known as the Mau Mau uprising, were arrested. Most of…

1950-1959 | Collective punishments | Kenya | Livestock targeted

Collective punishment against Kenyan villages deemed to be ‘hostile’

2 April 1952 On 2 April 1952, the Collective Punishments Ordinance was passed by Kenya’s British run colonial government. It allowed the governor to authorize fines as well as the requisition of cattle, crops and property on already impoverished populations, ‘where a tribe or group has been (deemed to be) openly hostile to the authorities.’1…

1950-1959 | Collective punishments | Curfews | Malaysia | Media propaganda

Town deemed ‘cowardly’ punished with sharp rice ration cut and curfew

26 March 1952 On 26 March 1952,  General Walter Templer, the British High Commissioner in Malaya, informed three hundred leading members of the Malayan, Chinese and Indian communities of Tanjong Malim that the entire town’s population of five thousand was to be subjected to a harsh collective punishment for an indefinite period.  It followed an…

1950-1959 | Egypt

British Army kills fifty Egyptian police officers

25 January 1952 By January 1952, the British Army, which was still stationed in Egypt’s Suez Canal Zone, was growing increasingly frustrated by attacks on its positions by small groups of Egyptian guerrilla fighters, who were determined to force their former colonial masters to evacuate. The British suspected the Egyptian police of failing to crack…